CARL DE KEYZER

East of Eden

1996

 

East of Eden explores the border area between two ideologies. In Eastern Europe’s current transitional phase, not all traces of communism have yet been erased, and democracy is still in its infancy. Old and new: one of these ideologies was heralded as 'the light in the darkness' fifty years ago, the other five years ago. Now they both seem to act as shadows.

 

Today's world is evolving rapidly and spectacularly. A shadow, conversely, evokes inertia and silence; it forces you to consider the transience of things. A shadow is a metaphor for memory or, inversely, expectation. Something rarefied suspended in the air, something inextricably linked with the object illuminated. A positive presence, but defined only in its outlines. In East of Eden, set in Eastern Europe in 1995, the spotlight is on survival and on the adaptation to complex changes. New facades and tenacious ruins are the signs of a reality overshadowed by the ideals of the new ideology and the traces of the past: a grey border zone, laden with traditions and dreams.